Monday, December 12, 2016

The origins of the deubré




If you are a certain age, Thingummyjig (1976–83) was a Scottish Television program showcasing the best in haggis, heather and tartan talent. The program was hosted by the acerbic, Jack McLaughlin (aka “The Laird o’ Coocaddens”). The origins of the term ‘thingamajig’ (n), in its many spellings, remain unclear but may stem from Middle English ‘thing’, derived from Old English þing, from Proto-Germanic *þingą. The word originally meant "assembly", then came to mean a specific issue discussed at such an assembly, and ultimately came to mean most broadly "an object". Thingamajig appears in the English language around 1824, but is predated by thingumbob (1751), and thingummy (1796). Synonyms include: dohickey, doohickey, doodad, doover (Australia), doomaflatchy, gizwiz, kadigan, thingamabob, thingumabob, thingummybob, thingo (Australia), thingummy, whatchamahoozie, whatnot, whatsit, and whatchamacallit. Something whose name has been forgotten or is not known.. The earliest recorded variant of ‘whatchamacallit’ is what-calle-ye-hym, attested from late 15c. A modern equivalent, origin unknown, is the Scottish term ‘doobrie,’ meaning something unspecified whose name is either forgotten or not known; a thingy or whatsit. < br>


The collective name for given to these words is placeholders which typically function grammatically as nouns and can be used for people, objects, locations, or places. Most are documented in at least 19th century literature.



In 1994, Damon Clegg, a Nike footwear designer, when presenting features of his design for a Nike ACG boot, and when he came to describe the ornamental shoelace tag, (which lacked a name). he instinctively used the term ‘doobrie.’ Clegg had heard his college roommate use the placename when he was unable to remember a specific name. His college friend was from Glasgow. The audience took the term ‘doobrie’ for a technical term, and the word caught on. Over time, the pronunciation evolved to doo-bray with various spellings. Eventually with the publication of a catalogue for the Nike Air Force 1 in 2006, Nike introduced the "deubré".



The deubré has two holes through which the shoelace is threaded, like a bead on string. When the shoe is laced, the deubré is centered between the first two eyelets (closest to the toe), with the shoelace passing through and behind the deubré. A deubré is typically made of metal, plastic, or leather, and may be decorated with a logo or text. Sometimes the deubré acts as a lace lock, eliminating the need for tying. A deubré may be used on a dress shoe or an athletic shoe.



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Thursday, December 8, 2016

Acne's fashion sandal withdrawn




After it was discovered luxury fashion house based Acne Studio's was selling £US400 "African inspired" sandals which are virtually identical in design to those made by The Shoe That Grows, (a US based non-profit organisation), the Swedish company denied copying the charity's design but has withdrawn the shoe from sale.



Now fashion experts are calling on Acne to "stand up for its values" by donating a portion of its profits to The Shoe That Grows, according to Tamsin Lejeune, ‎chief executive at the Ethical Fashion Forum .



The Shoe That Grows's footwear was launched in 2013 and is a durable, adjustable sandal that can expand up to five shoe sizes. The US-based company has made thousands of pairs available to children via charitable donations, as well as selling their shoes to the public, with each pair bought online paying for two further pairs to be donated to children living in poverty around the world.

Ludi's Story from Because International on Vimeo.



Monday, November 28, 2016

Dorothy’s ruby slippers gets a Kickstart




To help fund the repair of Dorothy’s ruby slippers, worn by Judy Garland in the classic 1939 film The Wizard of Oz, the Smithsonian Institution went to Kickstarter crowdfunding for help for the tentatively-titled On With The Show exhibition, opening in 2018.



The “world’s largest museum and research complex” receives federal assistance to support core functions such as, safeguarding its collections, building operations and maintenance, and staffing. But it also relies on private donations to support many other priorities, including the conservation and exhibition of precious objects like the Ruby Slippers. The ruby slipper project has now been fully funded, and a “stretch goal” of an additional $85,000 had been set to preserve the Scarecrow’s costume for the same exhibition.



The Smithsonian Institution previously funded a project to preserve the original spacesuits worn by Neil Armstrong and Alan Shepard during their space missions in the 1960s. The project will prepare the suits for display during a major exhibit celebrating the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing.



Read more about Dorothy's Slippers
Dorothy's red slippers: The most iconic shoes in Hollywood's history